How To Cook Crispy Hash Browns

It can be difficult to decide what kind of breakfast potato to make, but if you want to create some hash browns that taste just like the ones at your favorite restaurant, you should try this quick guide.

Hash browns made from shredded potatoes are shaped into pancake-like shapes and lightly fried in a skillet to get the ideal crispiness that goes perfectly with any breakfast meal.

How to make hash browns

  • First, shred your potatoes with your chosen method. You can use a food processor or grater.

 

  • Rinse the potatoes in clear water, then drain and squeeze out all the excess water (this will ensure the hash browns are extra crispy).
  • Add your binding agents (flour and egg), along with any additional ingredients or flavors. You can add cheese, chili pepper, onion, or garlic to the mixture.
  • One giant hash brown or several smaller pancake-like hash browns can be formed into patties, which you can then pan fried in oil for about five minutes on each side.

 

Tips on how to cook crispy hash browns

 

  • To wring out extra moisture from the shredded raw potato, use a potato ricer, an orange or lemon press, or a tea towel. Some people discover a salad spinner can be equally effective.

 

  • Warm the oil in the pan. Before adding the potatoes, make sure you've used enough oil to thoroughly coat the pan and start it shimmering.
  • Potatoes should be laid out in a thin layer. The hash browns will cook more evenly and crisp up better if there is a thin layer of potato shreds in the pan.
  • Wait until the potatoes are browned on one side before turning them. Once one side of the potatoes has been fried to a golden brown, turn them over to see if they are browning properly.

 

The best potatoes to use for hash browns

Use starchy potatoes, such as russets, if the crisp is essential to you. The only downside is that because they are so starchy, the hash browns can be prone to fall apart.

If you want your hash browns to hold together easily, use a waxy potato, such as Yukon Golds, red potatoes, or new potatoes. These potatoes will cling together in the pan due to their higher moisture content, but they won't crisp up as well as potatoes with a high starch content.